Minor Thoughts

In this present crisis, government is not the solution to our problem; government is the problem.

Ferguson

I find the entire situation in Ferguson to be infuriating and frustrating. I’m furious that a police officer got into an altercation with a young, black man and shot and killed him. I’m furious that the police department’s first response was to suit up and bring out the tactical military gear. I’m furious that MRAV’s, sniper rifles, and grenade launchers are considered appropriate tools for America’s civilian police force.

I was frustrated that it took 3 nights of standoffs, tear gas, and rubber bullets before Missouri governor Jay Nixon decided that something was wrong and relieved the police of responsibility for Ferguson. I was elated when the Missouri State Highway Patrol was given responsibility and responded by leading protestors through town, listening to protestors, and being photographed hugging protestors instead of pointing guns at them.

I was confused when I heard that protestors, on the very first night, had reacted to the shooting by looting and trashing a local convenience store. Looting, in general, confuses me. Who does that? Who responds to a tragedy by saying, “Screw it. I’m mad and I’m going to respond by beating up this other innocent bystander.”

Make no mistake, that’s what looting and vandalism is. It’s violence against the innocent and the uninvolved. Most stores that are looted are owned by local community members. They’re staffed by local community members. They provide goods, services, jobs, and incomes to local community members. By destroying them, you’re destroying local incomes, services, jobs, and wealth. You’re depriving the owner of a livelihood. You’re depriving the workers of an income. You’re depriving the people who live and work near that store of the services that that store provided.

I’ve heard that protestors are claiming that they looted because that was the only way to draw attention to their cause. That’s stupid. Protest marches, sit-ins, and rallies draw attention to your cause. Practicing non-violent resistance draws attention to your cause and generates sympathy from those watching. Looting and vandalism is a senseless act of violence and rage directed against those unfortunate enough to be located too close to the scene of tragedy. It’s violence for violence’s sake, responding to injustice by multiplying injustice.

So I was frustrated and angry when I heard that the night of calm in Ferguson was followed up with a night of renewed fighting and renewed vandalism. I was angry when I heard that the police stood back and allowed the looting to happen, forcing store owners to defend their own businesses. First the police over responded by armoring up and acting worse than most occupying forces. Then they under responded by allowing thugs to destroy community businesses. I’m angry because they don’t understand—and can’t perform—their own jobs.

I want justice in Ferguson. I want the police officer responsible for the shooting to be arrested and tried for murder, treated the same as any other civilian assailant. If a jury determines that his actions were justified, he can walk free and resume his job, the same as everyone else. If the jury determines otherwise, he can suffer the penalty, the same as everyone else.

And I want the looters to be arrested, charged, and tried as well. Their actions are neither necessary nor useful. They’re criminal and should be treated as such.

One final note. I’ve seen people on Twitter questioning why second amendment anti-tyranny gun nuts haven’t had anything to say about Ferguson. As one such nut, here’s my response.

The citizenry of Ferguson absolutely have a right to own weaponry sufficient to defend themselves from criminals, whether vandals or an overreaching police force. The police force certainly seems to have given sufficient provocation for these Americans to justify an armed response. It was just such provocations, in Boston, that ultimately led to the War for Independence.

That doesn’t mean that now is the right time for an armed response or that an armed response is the wisest course of action, at this time. I won’t absolutely advise against it, and I won’t absolutely advise it. I’m not on the ground in Ferguson, I don’t know all of the facts, and I don’t have the knowledge to speak wisely about the situation.

But the citizens of Ferguson, as citizens of the United States, have the right to assemble, to speak, and to petition for redress of grievances by any means necessary, either First or Second Amendment. But they don’t have the right to claim that violence against local property owners is one such means of redress. That’s why I’m increasingly angered with, and frustrated by, both sides of this standoff.